TED talks all around: Trigonis J. and Westcott V.

I’ve watched two interesting TED talks on crowdfunding that were brief, but nevertheless useful.

Crowdfunding today, tomorrow, together

trigonis1

John Trigonis is a movie maker and now also seen as somewhat of a crowdfunding expert. He says that engaging a crowd is an art. And I have to say from what I’ve heard and seen so far he is right.

“The pitch is the invitation, perks the incentives and promotion the interaction with your crowd.”
– John Trigonis

He tells that when you do a campaign video you should always tell the following to your crowd:

  • You should tell who you are
  • What your project is all about
  • Why your audience should fund you

You should speak to your audience like they are a friend. A very personal approach is needed to get your crowd enthused and willing to spend money on you and your project.

Crowdfunding 101

victoriawestcott

Victoria Westcott talks about crowdfunding in relation with her youth. She was a very entrepreneurial spirit and still is. Out of the experiences she had in her youth with selling all kinds of things, like lemonade in her street, she gives us 5 lessons. Five lessons to live by when you do a crowdfunding campaign.

  1. Make something awesome
  2. sell to your audience
  3. Don’t ask for charity
  4. Follow through
  5. They might just give you tips

In summary you should just make an awesome project that people want to be involved with. You need to grab them by the hair so to speak. You need to sell. Persuade them to buy the product from you. Let them see you want to improve something through the realisation of your project. Remember that it’s not charity that you do with your project. Stand behind it. Be persistent and be kind and be changeable in the way you present your product.

Conclusion

Two things that I see constantly with building a crowd and achieving your goal. Be persistent and be very personal in your approach. We tried this during our whole campaign and you can see the outcome of that: Success!

 

 

 

An evening on story telling

The power of storytelling is a big one, definitely when I look at the entrepreneurs that I follow on youtube and their success. Names like Sam Ovens, Casey Neistat, Shaun Mcbride, Tai Lopez, Emilie Wapnick and many others who earn their bread with this inspiring skill. To make our course as compelling as possible Michaela Krömer went to a storytelling workshop and asked if I could come as well. Of course I decided yes. Being able to tell a good story is one of the things I could use big time in the campaign and I’d love being able to tell my stories in a more inspiring way. So off we went.

The workshop

The workshop storytelling took three hours, but there was never a dull moment. The way it was presented was entirely in the style of storytelling. It intrigued me, especially the amount of interaction Eldridge, the lecturer, had with the audience. You could stop the lecture whenever you had a burning question and this gave a great sense involvement. This gave a aura of freedom in the room. Many theories, examples and tools were discussed during the course. To name a few.

In this post we will take a look at the Drama and Winners Triangle. The other methods and theories will be explained in other posts. If you want to read them you can click on the link and you can read on what it is all about.

Drama & Winner’s Triangle

These two concepts are actually very interesting to look over and are in most forms of communication very handy to use. It is a framework on which rol you can play or to get insight in the rolls that you play unnoticed. There is a positive side and a negative side in this. Obviously the Drama Triangle is the negative counterpart of the Winner’s Triangle. I’ll start with the drama triangle.

Drama Triangle

Drama Triangle

The Drama Triangle is shown in the picture above. The Drama Triangle is a model that shows the relations between the three rolls Persecutor, Rescuer and Victim.You can see these rolls for example in movies, You have a Hero an Villain and a Victim, someone who has to be saved. But if we examine our communication and that of others we see that we also apply these rolls ourselves.

What are those roles entail?

To give an example in the Batman Series you have Batman as the Hero, The Joker as the villain or persecutor and Gotham or Rachel as the Victim that has to be saved. This model is being used in a lot of movies and therefor we see it too often as truthful. The reality is that this is most of the time a destructive way of communication for at least one of the two parties. Batman has to hide his true identity and has many problems in his social life because of this. The Joker is a crazy person and won’t be any help for the world, because he wants to watch it burn. Lastly the Victim, Gotham city, will be always dependant of his Hero, Batman.

So when something happens to him Gotham is helpless. The theory says and I think most people would agree, that these rolls are all undesirable to play. The way to solve this is to look at the Winner’s Triangle. See below.

Winner’s Triangle

WinnersTriangleThe Winner’s Triangle is the positive counterpart of the Drama Triangle. It is the realistic roll you can play that is constructive for both parties. The three parties of this Triangle are The Coach, the Challenger and the Creator. The Rescuer becomes the Coach, the Persecutor becomes the Challenger and the Victim becomes the Creator.

Coach, Challenger and Creator, what are those?

The Winner Triangle twists the negative points that the three rolls, Victim, Rescuer and Persecutor, have into positives. The Victim becomes the Creator and becomes his own rescuer by dealing and solving their own problems. They ignore the scoldings or remarks of the Persecutor. The Persecutor becomes the Challenger that instead of putting people down by their negative exclamations challenge people to make healthy choices. The Rescuer becomes the coach. Preferably they coach proactively before the people whom being coached head for trouble.

These triangles can also be very helpful in your communication. On stage, during a meeting, on social media or on your website. With this framework you can pinpoint where you stand yourself in different relationships you have or how you communicated on the web so far and see how it can be beneficially be changed in the future.

How you communicate and a pitch

For me this was an epiphany. The whole lecture was a great way to learn a bit more on how I communicate and what could be different about it, on or off stage. One thing I’m particularly proud of was when asked if anyone would give a pitch I was one of the few who would raise their hand. Actually to my own surprise, because in reality I was pretty scared to actually do it. After the break we would start with the pitches. I actually practised a couple of times on a pitch about “having a mentor to excel”, but when I got called to the stage I changed my mind. I didn’t feel the things I was going to say so I quickly came up with the subject I had absolutely my heart for: Delitelabs. The way we help people who need it most. I felt like a badass and it actually was a pretty good pitch I heard afterwords. So good that we got a couple of people interjected us afterwords. They asked if it was a real endeavour I talked about. When I said yes they immediately wanted to help. Great how things can work out when you do something you’re afraid off.

Conclusion

We can use many things that I have learned in this lecture. We can implement these learnings in the posts that we are going to put out before, during and after the crowdfunding campaign. This kind of storytelling I’d love to implement in the posts we are going to put out on Facebook, Twitter, instagram and hopefully on our blog. This lecture will only be the beginning, because in one lecture I’m not yet a storyteller. At least not a professional one at that. So a long way to go, but the beginning has been set.

Hope to talk to you guys soon. Leave a comment if you have a question or have something to share.

– Bas