Feedback and reflection on the movie

Before and after I made the movie I have asked Bob van Schaik and Toon Koebrugge for a few tips and feedback on the movie I made.

The chat with Bob

Before I did the movie I had a chat with Bob about the movie. He gave me a couple of points on what I should do with it. He gave me elaborate response. He gave me a couple of books that I could borrow from him and which I am using, like “Video Marketing in 60 seconden” by Pelpina Trip, “Bedrijfsfilms zijn uit, videomarketing is in” by Wim Symoens and “Formats de next step in content marketing” by Aart Lensink. To read about the summaries of these books click here.

Viewing direction and the Rule of Thirds

As I was saying, Bob gave me a couple of interesting tips on how to go about the movie that I have shot the day after we discussed it. First of, when I am filming a participant and it is a shot like an interview. Be careful that he doesn’t look in the camera, but slightly next to it. If the viewing direction of the participant is to the right, make sure that the you have more space on the side where the participant is looking at. Here I should also implement the the Rule of thirds. When you look further at the subject of framing. The eyes of the person in front of the camera should always be on vertically one third of the screen like this:

Flexibilian framing

Also place the participant between objects if they are objects around him/her. With this He told me I had to be sure that the background is interesting to view, that not only the participant is the object of interest to the viewer but also the background. This makes the shots that you take more interesting to the viewers.

The interview: open questions and shut your face

Another two tips of Bob were the open questions. This seems very fulsome to add, but one of the most important elements of a good interview. Questions that start with: what, how and why. And with that. As human beings we have the natural tendency to acknowledge our fellow man, especially in conversation. He pressed that I should shut my mouth and just nod at best. This is one of the biggest reasons so much recorded audio by greenies is ready for the trashcan.

A few final notes

The last tips he went over pretty fast, but still very valuable if you ask me. I had experience with fucking up footage and this is one of the things he warned me about. For example the footage not being sharp. He said I could easily foresee this by zooming in completely and make sure that I make this zoomed in image sharp and go from there. Another is a headphone set, to really hear if the audio is free of noise, or at least as much as possible. With that the last tip he gave me. To record good audio, especially in an interview I should consider a Clip-on. A small microphone that you can attach to the speakers jacket/shirt. This is most of the time the best option because with this you have very noise free audio and it is not that expensive to rent. He even suggested a place to rent it in Amsterdam. It is called Budgetcam.com. It should be like 50 euro to rent it for a day.

The chat afterward with Toon

After I shot, edited and added text to the video I was pretty content on what I had achieved. I find it not bad, but it can always be better of course. But especially with the means that I had to create the video I was kind of happy with the result. Even more when Toon himself said it was nicely done. I asked him for some feedback and he said that some shots could be a little shorter to keep the flow in the whole of the movie going.
Another point he had were the words that I used. In some shots I had played around with the speed of the sentences that came into view. He suggested that I would choose one overall speed that the letters/words came into view and only change that if it was a real important message, like the call to action.

Conclusion: to sum it all up

I find it a great privilege to have a couple of friends who can give me professional advise on how to make a movie. I’ve learned a lot and implemented a couple of things from the suggestions they made. I’ve zoomed in on a couple of shots where I wasn’t sure it was sharp enough. I’ve tried to implement the rule of Thirds as much as I could and changed the speed of the words that came into the movie. The final result you can see here:

Thank you so much Bob and Toon! Check their professional profiles and websites in the links!

– Bas